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The Sin Boldly Podcast

The Sin Boldly Podcast is a combination of a radio show offered through KPFT 90.1 in Houston as well as teaching material from First Evangelical Lutheran Church in Houston. The content is apologetic, polemic, and tradition in its Christian worldview. It means to clearly convey the Christian view as opposed to others. All in love, of course!
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Now displaying: October, 2017
Oct 27, 2017

In this solo episode, I look at a handful of issues, including some thoughts on the Reformation given that its anniversary is upon us. I also speak about the Battle of Raqqa, a significant victory in the war against ISIS that seems to be largely ignored. Finally I look at the corporate exemptions the Trump administration seems to be granting on religious grounds and ask if corporations should be treated the same as individuals in matters of conscience. 

Why the name “Sin Boldly”? Martin Luther wrote to his friend Philip Melanchthon in 1521: “If you are a preacher of mercy, do not preach an imaginary but the true mercy. If the mercy is true, you must therefore bear the true, not an imaginary sin. God does not save those who are only imaginary sinners. Be a sinner, and let your sins be strong [sin boldly], but let your trust in Christ be stronger, and rejoice in Christ who is the victor over sin, death, and the world.” To sin boldly, therefore, is not to seek unholy living, but to follow the course we believe the Bible demands even if the world is against us. And if and when we sin, trust in an even greater savior.

First Lutheran also publishes a daily podcast called The Scarlet Thread (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-scarlet-thread/id1110938468?mt=2). This podcast is a reading of the appointed texts for the Two-Year Daily Lectionary. After two years, listeners will have heard most of the Old Testament once and most of the New Testament twice. If you are liturgically-minded and want a little more Bible in your life, this is a great podcast for you.

Oct 20, 2017

In this solo episode I look at a number of issues, including how Artificial Intelligence will replace God. Yes, some are working towards an AI replacement of God. (The truth is that man will soothe himself with technology that is built to serve him rather than bend the knee at God's Word.) I also look at the Hefner/Weinstein connection and a new poll that asks if religion does more harm than good. 

Why the name “Sin Boldly”? Martin Luther wrote to his friend Philip Melanchthon in 1521: “If you are a preacher of mercy, do not preach an imaginary but the true mercy. If the mercy is true, you must therefore bear the true, not an imaginary sin. God does not save those who are only imaginary sinners. Be a sinner, and let your sins be strong [sin boldly], but let your trust in Christ be stronger, and rejoice in Christ who is the victor over sin, death, and the world.” To sin boldly, therefore, is not to seek unholy living, but to follow the course we believe the Bible demands even if the world is against us. And if and when we sin, trust in an even greater savior.

First Lutheran also publishes a daily podcast called The Scarlet Thread (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-scarlet-thread/id1110938468?mt=2). This podcast is a reading of the appointed texts for the Two-Year Daily Lectionary. After two years, listeners will have heard most of the Old Testament once and most of the New Testament twice. If you are liturgically-minded and want a little more Bible in your life, this is a great podcast for you.

Oct 18, 2017

Like the class on adult baptism, this talk may not really be a program for the usual Sin Boldly listener. It is the fifth part of a class called Jesus 101 that seeks to lay out the basics for a person unfamiliar with Christianity. This class looks at the works of Jesus: what do his miracles teach us about God's Kingdom? I use the senses of the body as helpful memory devices: sight, sound, taste, touch and hearing. This is a class I developed originally to reach out to college students, and I am using it now to teach a number of a young adults in the congregation.

Why the name “Sin Boldly”? Martin Luther wrote to his friend Philip Melanchthon in 1521: “If you are a preacher of mercy, do not preach an imaginary but the true mercy. If the mercy is true, you must therefore bear the true, not an imaginary sin. God does not save those who are only imaginary sinners. Be a sinner, and let your sins be strong [sin boldly], but let your trust in Christ be stronger, and rejoice in Christ who is the victor over sin, death, and the world.” To sin boldly, therefore, is not to seek unholy living, but to follow the course we believe the Bible demands even if the world is against us. And if and when we sin, trust in an even greater savior.

First Lutheran also publishes a daily podcast called The Scarlet Thread (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-scarlet-thread/id1110938468?mt=2). This podcast is a reading of the appointed texts for the Two-Year Daily Lectionary. After two years, listeners will have heard most of the Old Testament once and most of the New Testament twice. If you are liturgically-minded and want a little more Bible in your life, this is a great podcast for you.

Oct 10, 2017

I was joined by friend, cousin and architect Julien Meyrat to look at Hurricane Harvey and related issues of development and the economics of providing housing for growing populations. The wide-ranging conversation explores what can be done in the wake of flooding and what the future of urban housing looks like. This is a bit different from the usual content here at Sin Boldly, but hey, when you have an expert around, you take advantage! 

Why the name “Sin Boldly”? Martin Luther wrote to his friend Philip Melanchthon in 1521: “If you are a preacher of mercy, do not preach an imaginary but the true mercy. If the mercy is true, you must therefore bear the true, not an imaginary sin. God does not save those who are only imaginary sinners. Be a sinner, and let your sins be strong [sin boldly], but let your trust in Christ be stronger, and rejoice in Christ who is the victor over sin, death, and the world.” To sin boldly, therefore, is not to seek unholy living, but to follow the course we believe the Bible demands even if the world is against us. And if and when we sin, trust in an even greater savior.

First Lutheran also publishes a daily podcast called The Scarlet Thread (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-scarlet-thread/id1110938468?mt=2). This podcast is a reading of the appointed texts for the Two-Year Daily Lectionary. After two years, listeners will have heard most of the Old Testament once and most of the New Testament twice. If you are liturgically-minded and want a little more Bible in your life, this is a great podcast for you.

Oct 6, 2017

I was joined in studio by Dr. David Michael Smith, a member of the Houston Socialist Movement to discuss basic worldview questions. Should we all be socialists? Is capitalism inherently exploitative? As always, I hope to show respect to my guests and let them speak for themselves and we did not have a strict format. I will let the listener decide where they stand on this fundamental question to the ordering of a society. 

Why the name “Sin Boldly”? Martin Luther wrote to his friend Philip Melanchthon in 1521: “If you are a preacher of mercy, do not preach an imaginary but the true mercy. If the mercy is true, you must therefore bear the true, not an imaginary sin. God does not save those who are only imaginary sinners. Be a sinner, and let your sins be strong [sin boldly], but let your trust in Christ be stronger, and rejoice in Christ who is the victor over sin, death, and the world.” To sin boldly, therefore, is not to seek unholy living, but to follow the course we believe the Bible demands even if the world is against us. And if and when we sin, trust in an even greater savior.

First Lutheran also publishes a daily podcast called The Scarlet Thread (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-scarlet-thread/id1110938468?mt=2). This podcast is a reading of the appointed texts for the Two-Year Daily Lectionary. After two years, listeners will have heard most of the Old Testament once and most of the New Testament twice. If you are liturgically-minded and want a little more Bible in your life, this is a great podcast for you.

Oct 3, 2017

Like the class on adult baptism, this talk may not really be a program for the usual Sin Boldly listener. It is the fourth part of a class called Jesus 101 that seeks to lay out the basics for a person unfamiliar with Christianity. This class looks at the words of Jesus: what were some of Jesus' key teachings? I use various directions as helpful memory devices related to what Jesus teaches: up, down, in, out, and back. This is a class I developed originally to reach out to college students, and I am using it now to teach a number of a young adults in the congregation.

Why the name “Sin Boldly”? Martin Luther wrote to his friend Philip Melanchthon in 1521: “If you are a preacher of mercy, do not preach an imaginary but the true mercy. If the mercy is true, you must therefore bear the true, not an imaginary sin. God does not save those who are only imaginary sinners. Be a sinner, and let your sins be strong [sin boldly], but let your trust in Christ be stronger, and rejoice in Christ who is the victor over sin, death, and the world.” To sin boldly, therefore, is not to seek unholy living, but to follow the course we believe the Bible demands even if the world is against us. And if and when we sin, trust in an even greater savior.

First Lutheran also publishes a daily podcast called The Scarlet Thread (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-scarlet-thread/id1110938468?mt=2). This podcast is a reading of the appointed texts for the Two-Year Daily Lectionary. After two years, listeners will have heard most of the Old Testament once and most of the New Testament twice. If you are liturgically-minded and want a little more Bible in your life, this is a great podcast for you.

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